Tuesday, May 22, 2012

Grocery Produce Sprouting Progress

 Before

One week later

Cool, huh?

I took my cousin's advice and put my sprouting lettuce in dirt.  And it turns out he was right.  It's growing.  Yipppeee!

The chives are also growing, obviously.  Thing is, we never actually eat chives/green onions.  What am i supposed to do with these?

Suggestions are welcome.

5 comments:

  1. I used to not eat chives either. Now I use the whole part of the onion. Stir fry, salad, soup, stir in at the last minute with other vegetables (steamed squashes or green beans)put them in a meatloaf, or casserole...or in a spreadable cheese (thinking about cheese because it's time to make cheese...)

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  2. Do chives have any specific nutritional benefits that would encourage me to integrate them into our diet?

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    1. Onions contain allyl propyl disulphide, which has been shown to lower blood sugar levels. Quercetin, an antioxidant found in green onions, offers anti-inflammatory and anti-histamine benefits. Onions are rich in chromium, an essential mineral used by the body to regulate glucose and for the metabolism and storage of macronutrients. Green onions are rich in vitamin C which not only boosts immunity, but offers protection from cardiovascular disease, eye disease, and skin wrinkling. Other nutrients found in green onions include fiber, manganese, vitamin B6, potassium, and copper.


      Onions also help reduce risk of colon and other cancers.

      Oh...they are also good in an omelette!

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    2. :) Thanks, Laura!

      It's funny. Yesterday, James made a meatloaf for dinner (he hadn't read this blog post yet), and he put some of our green onions in the meatloaf. :)

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  3. Chives and green onions are a staple around here for baked potatoes and omlets, but then again.. I do like just about anything green.

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What do you think about that?